Can these hoggie eggs be saved?

Can these eggs be saved? They are hognose eggs. I know they are on the wrong substrate, I thought I had more time to prepare for them but they came a bit early. I’m getting perlite now. They’re at around 80° For temp. They have strong veins. I made the mistake of lightly spraying them directly and I’m not sure if that’s okay for hoggie eggs. This is my first time breeding and while I know the basics on how to incubate, I’m still ill prepared for things like this. You can yell at me because I need it, but if they can be saved please tell me how to do so.

1 Like

@stewart_reptiles would be a great help

3 Likes

There is a good chance they can be saved, depending on how long they’ve been deflated for. Increase the humidity, put some sphagnum moss around them and they should bounce back.

4 Likes

I’m glad you posted about this rather than just trying to fix it yourself while not sure if you’re doing it right, some people won’t post about things like this just because they don’t want to appear to not be doing it right. If you don’t already add a lid or make it a tighter seal and add things that hold humidity like sphagnum moss and spray around the eggs on the substrate to raise humidity. If you do these things then there’s a good chance that these eggs will recover and hatch.

4 Likes

Will me spraying them directly have a negative impact on them? In my panic I totally forgot about that little fact… I didn’t soak them, but they did all get a good few sprays… I hope they don’t mold because of that.

Since this post I have put them in perlite and draped moss over them. They are at 82-84° now. I’ll check in a week or so if they plumped back up and/or are starting to grow mold.

1 Like

I don’t know if spraying them damaged them but next time just spray the substrate around them, even if the eggs are damaged just keep incubating, if they start to grow mold I’m pretty sure you can fix it with athletes foot powder.

3 Likes

In this type of emergency, if one didn’t have supplies, could one use a damp paper towel until one could get moss…

1 Like

Whatever can hold high humidity can work, so yes damp paper towels could work if need be.

1 Like

I definitely wouldn’t spray directly on the eggs. I’ve had eggs deflate before at all points during incubation. I’ve found eggs that had been laid a couple days prior, look pretty horrible and bounce back in a day or two. I’ve also had eggs deflate at 35 days, which tells me I need to increase the humidity. If they start to window and go transparent though, decrease your humidity.

1 Like

In my panic I forgot that I shouldn’t directly spray them and I did it. Is that a for sure death sentence for them? I have moss in there with them now, how long should I leave it in there with them? I’ve had moss start to grow mold on its own so I don’t want to keep it in there with them for too long.

1 Like

Incubate 'til there's no debate
I don’t think spraying them guaranteed ruined them however the survival rate might be lower but there should still should be all/mostly viable eggs. I don’t think the moss is likely to grow mold in warmer temperatures like in an incubator though it’s a possibility.

3 Likes