Can you Co-hab Amazon tree boas

I’ve seen people co hab green trees so that has me wondering if I can do hab my Amazon tree boas I haven’t seen anyone say no so that is why I came here to see if anyone has done it

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You can keep a pair together.
You need atleast a 2 foot long x 3 foot tall for one. They will use all the space. So if you wanted a pair I personally would up the size to 3x4 and put more hiding spaces etc in.
And keep in mind they will breed so be prepared for that!
Assuming you know they’re live bearers?

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If you do decide to house them together they need to be seperated during feeding (like all cohabitated snakes).

They do fine that way except for feeding. They will drop separate food items and end up fighting over one. They’re really dumb about it. Turn around for two second and you’ll be pulling one’s head out of the other’s mouth.

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I keep quite a few pairs together. It all depends on the individual but in my 20+ years of keeping Corallus I have noticed that they actually are more of a social reptile compared to most others. I even have some who have been just downright nasty &want to tag everything in their sight turn into complete puppy dog tame animals after being cohabbed with another mate. I don’t know of it was just the lack of getting laid or what but i chock it up to finding out that everything else in the world is not necessarily there to cause it harm &it seems the best way to introduce that notion is with one of it’s own kind. As previously stated, take the absolute utmost care when it comes to feeding &seperate one or both animals into a feeding area of some sort to ensure that no accidents or fighting over food occurs &you honestly are golden. Avoid placing two males together as well but honestly, the most they will do is wrestle, stress &annoy eachother with very little striking if any. Like I mentioned before- each snake is an individual with it’s own personality, probability &preferences so it is important to watch your snake &read its reaction with placed with potential partners or cagemates. I have had amazons that want nothing to do with one another just to pair them up with a different animal &they are all over eachother like long lost friends so keep that in mind &don’t get discouraged if you are trying to breed the species. It is just like with humans, sometimes there just is no spark there or something is off putting about the person in the room with you. It doesn’t mean they are a bad person or that you or them won’t ever find the right person, it’s just not the right one at the right place at the right time.

I am usually a HUGE proponent of snakes &most reptiles being solitary animals who only come together for breeding purposes &should only be housed as so. I think it is unnecessary stress &causes multiple little discrepancies in food, heat, water, chill spots, ect. that most people wouldn’t even notice. But there are definitely the exception to the “rule” as obviously, not all animals are created equally. I am by no means saying my way is “the way” I am merely giving my observations &experiences with years &years of caring for &breeding this species &many similar ones so please take that for what it is worth. I would not be wasting my time or energy to be putting this information out there if it wasn’t my true belief.

Follow all of the basic knowledge, know that if housing multiple animals you will need to extend cage dimensions, offer multiple basking sites with extra heating sources, make sure there is more than one access to fresh drinking water &especially with this species LOTS of cork tube hiding spaces. They love them &they (or something very similar, rounded tubes) help make them feel very secure &they also enjoy hanging out on top of them so they can be used for basking spots as well. Just be careful not to put too many or you will never ever see them :wink:

I hope that this information is helpful &that it can help someone who may be struggling with a fiesty rapidfire death noodle of their own.

Skòl
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