Clutch of eggs after 60 days

What I have to do if no one snakes pips after 60 days?

That depends entirely upon your tub setup, the incubation temperature, how stable the environment in the incubator has been, etc. An egg incubated at 90 degrees can pip in 54 days. An egg incubated at 88 degrees can pip in 60 days. An egg at 87 degrees can pip in 67 days. Your thermostat may be set to a temperature, but are you certain that has been the actual temperature in the incubator? How are you checking the temps? Are you using a temp gun, a thermometer, etc? We need more information in order to determine next steps.

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I set my temperature at 87. Now they are 53 days in incubator… And i don’t think the babies are ready to pips(I candle it and I can see the embryo) … I don’t know if is normal

I wouldn’t mess with them, sometimes the eggs don’t hatch anywhere close to the hatch date but still come out fine, there’s a larger risk of opening them too early than opening them too late. Just be patient and wait until they pip on their own.

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Just leave them be, they will pip when they are ready. Stop counting days because they never go when people say they will. I just had a baby pip out at day 70

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Thaks for your comment… And yes… This is make sense. But… You know for the amateur like me is important to have some “road map” just to prevent errors. And another think… There are many theory “main stream” like to cut the eggs,than can get in confusion…

I’ll probably be torched for saying this but the road map should be:

  • Incubate at a temperature between 87 and 89.5
  • Make certain your incubator temps and environment remain stable
  • Let the animals pip on their own

The reasons people cut are:

  • They see others do it so it must be alright
  • They are impatient
  • It makes good theater for promoting their FB page, You-Tube Channel, or Website
  • Occasionally an egg doesn’t pip within 48 to 72 hours of all of the rest

The last incident is the only reason I personally would give a pass on cutting. The rest is just the need for expedient gratification. The reality is there is usually zero benefit to it, with plenty of potential downside.

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It’s condition specific. My old incubator hatched eggs in 55-56 days. My newest one hatches them in 69-70 days. Until you know what to expect, I wouldn’t even think of cutting.

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Thaks for your comment… I would ask you… Why someone choose to set the incubator at 87 or 89.5? What is the difference in the result?

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I believe that anywhere within those numbers are a safe range. When I first started breeding, I had set my incubator to 89.5. My experience was that the eggs pipped on or around Day 54 if everything went right. However, I also found that I was having trouble with them starting to feed on their own. I had a number of babies, almost half of the clutch at times, refuse to eat. I was using small, live mouse hoppers so there shouldn’t have been an issue. After 6 weeks I had to assist feed them. I had read from someone else’s experience, that by lowering the temperatures they seemed to have babies hatch that had better mass and feeding responses. I tried it and can honestly say that I have never had to assist feed a baby since. I can’t swear it’ll be true for anyone else, but it has been for me. That is why I now incubate at 87.5. Just know that it now takes the eggs about 61 to 63 days to pip at the lowered temperature. So it will require more patience, but it has been worth it to me. I am not trying to beat anyone to the market, so a week extra is irrelevant if the animals feed well for me.

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By and large, people tend to incubate at higher temps to get their hatchlings out sooner. As with so many things in this hobby, it is a matter of pushing for instant gratification.

I incubate at 30-31 and, like @graysnake, my eggs typically pip around Day 63. I have also noticed the same anecdotal benefit tendency toward feeding and robustness

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What do you think about the supplements when the snakes stop to feeding? Could be a nice solution?

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So…would you recommend that others cool their temps a little? Just wondering because if I get in to breeding BPs then I would want the most robust and best feeders I could produce.

It’s so variable you can’t really say what to do with a blanket statement. I incubate at 86 degrees because that’s what I’ve done since the beginning, I started with gtps tho. With that said even at 86 my old incubator still hatched them in 55ish days. My assumption is it was getting pressurized. My current incubator hatches them in 70ish days at 86. All I look for is egg yolks to mostly be used up, that seems to be a good sign of a strong baby. If I had hatchlings trying to crawl out before that or any other indication of less than ideal hatchling, I would lower the temps. I think people focus too much on the numbers than the animals when it comes to incubation in general.

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To be honest Eddy, I have zero experience with supplements and it would be reckless of me to comment one way or another.

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Unless you’ve had several years of tuning your incubation settings, I’d say to aim lower than higher temperature wise. You just need to be patient, and incubate until there’s no debate!

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^^^^
This, right here

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