Flying Snakes!

The Paradise Flying Snake is best known for its ability to glide from tree to tree, which is possible through aerobatic undulation; they flatten out their ribs and “wriggle” in the air, allowing them to glide. Nature is wild!

Ft. Reign, one of our beautiful Paradise Flying Snakes.

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So it seems like you keep a lot of interesting/uncommon species. Is that true? Very cool looking snake. Have you been able to see any of the flying behavior? Or do they flatten themselves defensively at all?

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Yes, I do tend to gravitate towards more “oddball” species of snakes. I’ve not witnessed them follow through with a full glide; but while hunting or exploring, they do often extend their bodies out far from the edge of one of their peak climbing points and sway the upper portion of their bodies back and forth before they either attack their prey or explore an area that sparks their curiosity. Very interesting behavior and an absolute joy to watch.

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I wouldn’t say oddball snake species more like “interesting” and “unique”. You seem to take more interest in neat species that otherwise would have probably been overlooked. Your just appreciate what nature has to offer even if its a lil off the beaten path.

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I think we ALL entered oddball range when we got these legless lovelies…

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All except me that is since I dont have any reptiles yet lol.

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What is the trick to these? Ive had them basking during the day, pounding lizards, drinking from mist bottle all is well then DEAD! They are beautiful snakes and really amazing to watch in a big enclosure but man I had a trio a little while ago of juvies and while they were seeming to thrive for a short period of time…Cost quite a bit to set them up right too it was a real disappointment

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Did you treat them for parasites, and do you treat the feeders (assuming they are WC) for parasites as well? I treat all WC snakes for parasites upon arrival, and also treat WC feeders for at least two weeks prior to feeding. Sudden death of seemingly established WC imports is usually attributed to an underlying parasitic infection.

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I didnt treat them. After hearing so much emphasis on how easily they stress and fragile they are I didnt want to take em behind the head and panacur them like I do my more robust animals. Even my more robust animals if fresh wc I try to hydrate them and have them eat a few times before I panacur or flagyl them so I was really nervous to aggressively/quickly medicate these paradisi. Do you do a flagyl and panacur treatment on them or just panacure?

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