New Snake Problem, Cool Seeking

I got a snake in last Wednesday who was on the warmer side when she arrived. She was given a heat pack and the box was a hair smaller than I would of used. Regardless she is looking and acting for the most part healthy. She was in blue when she arrived which I was also told she would be while in route. She came in around 560. A little larger than I had planned, I still put her in a ve18 I had setup to make her feel secure over something larger for the first few weeks as I planned. I gave her a few days and being so deep in shed I waited until Sunday(yesterday) to feed her, she had a full shed when I opened for feeding and she also ate. She also had a movement that I found checking on her this afternoon. The problem is I keep finding her on the cool side. I know that this can be a sign to ease respiratory pain. She has shown no other signs other than. Cool seeking,. I’m trying to let her chill. She does go to the warm side but seems to spend more time up front than normal. Should I take her to a vet and run a panel or watch her and hope she kicks it? She’s in good shape but if anything a little over weight. With her eating and having a good movement and shed but seeking cool. I’m unsure. Thanks

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I don’t see a problem at all if it’s isolated behavior.
I would just keep an eye on her.

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I have had this happen many times and I not too long ago received a breeder female pastel het clown that has been up in the front for the past 3 or so weeks. She ate for me and is doing great just like all the other animals I have had that stay on the cool side for the most part. I really see nothing wrong with your girl unless she is exhibiting odd behaviors that she hasn’t shown before. My theory as to why new arrivals do this is because it is their way of coping and settling in to a new and unfamiliar area. Like what Crawd said just keep a eye on her. Best of luck!

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The fact that she has eaten already is a good indicator that she is in good health. Even healthy BPs can take a long time to start feeding, so it’s a very good sign. Just keep an eye out for symptoms like audible breathing, oral or nasal discharge, bubbles at the mouth or blocked nostrils.

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