Royal python egg incubation temps

So, I’ve been wondering as to what temps matter. I’ve been measuring the incubator which says 91-91.8 degrees Fahrenheit but my egg temps are around 88.1-89 degrees Fahrenheit.

What am I aiming for here? I’ve been slightly panicking as everyone says 89 and my incubator has been at 91 for the past month now, so I think I might as well carry on with these temps, I’ve heard people have had successful hatch rates with these temps but I always come to you guys for advice :sweat_smile:

How long have they been in the incubator? Those temps sound high to me. If it were me, I would drop the temp back to 89. Cooler wont hurt, but too high can impact the development in negative ways. I regularly incubate at 87.5 degrees. It takes longer, about 60 to 62 days, but what I have found through my own experience is that eggs incubated at the lower temps, seem to produce slightly larger hatchlings with better feeding responses. If you haven’t been incubating them too long, it shouldn’t hurt them to drop it down a little, at least down to 89. Best of luck.

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Well, it’s been 26 days now but I’ll drop them anyways, just to be on the safe side, I’ll candle them to see if they are viable still. I expect them to hatch around the 19th May, so incubating them for 62 days. Thanks, I’ll try lower next season I think. I’ve learnt quite a lot this first season!

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I incubate at 30C. Takes a little longer but the babies come out a little more robust I find

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Approximately how much longer? I’m intrigued as to how different temps effect the offspring incubation time.

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A week… Maybe ten days. Nothing major

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I’m incubating this year at 88 egg box temp, but the thermostat is set to 87. I’ve actually lowered the temp by just half a degree two weeks from 60 days, the increase of metabolism can actually further raise the temperature of a small box

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Like the animals themselves the eggs are a bit more tolerant than we want to give them credit for. A range between 85-95 is said to be ok with 88-90 being the ideal. But I never like to get over 91 personally, higher temps are definitely associated with death/defects. Like many have said cooler 87-88 is my normal mean temps(inside egg box), I keep therms in both the incubator for thermostat & boxes(1 per shelf) for more specific monitoring. It will take a few days longer but less dangerous conditions. As for how much longer I don’t concern about, just wait for the 1st to pip and ok cut the rest. I track to day 56 so I know when to start watching more closely.

I’ve never actually recorded if a lower temp incubation results in better feeding response from hatchlings. That was an interesting comment & something I’ll have to watch for.

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My sample set is small but when I was incubating at 90 to 91 degrees, I always had to assist feed an animal or two. One clutch I had to assist feed half the clutch, and this is after trying to let them eat on their own for 5 to 6 weeks. Since I lowered my temps, I have never had to assist feed again. It could be a coincidence, but I will never know because I won’t raise the temps back up. I like the results as they are now.

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I personally incubate at 88 or 89. In my experiences any higher than that increases problems. I myself would never incubate over 90.

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I agree.
Just anecdotal, but i have hatched hundreds of other snakes and i too believe too hot can cause health problems through that experiance.
In addition, what if your thermometer is reading lower than the actual temperature? You could go over max temps that way without knowing and harm your snakes.
So… for me better safe than sorry.
I am new to ball python egg incubation but will go for a few degrees cooler than normal.
30.5c (87F) to 31c (88F) A few days extra incubation is better than health problems.
Not a recommendation, just my opinion. And I am confident it will not cause problems for me.
Not evidenced, but in my mind, 32c (89.5F) would not be found in the area ball pythons live, in the rainy season, with a wet snake den (rodent burrow) due to depth reducing temperature and evaporation reducing temperature in a snake den.
But I am happy to hear and consider alternative positions.

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