Success! Tri-Color Hogs

We have had a successful lock with our Tri-Color Hogs! Very excited to go through this process and hopefully get some baby TCHs.

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Congrats!! Can’t wait to see the eggs and eventual baby hogs :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

I’m hoping to get a pair of tricolors myself in the future. Haven’t had any luck finding females on the marketplace so I’m biding my time :rofl:

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Those are hognose?! I had no idea they came in that color/pattern! Very cool!

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@mblaney These are Xenodon (formerly Lystrophis) pulcher, not Heterodon nasicus. They are a South American species that top out around 2’, with a little sexual dimorphism.

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Look at them doing the sexy time

And you taking pictures LoL.

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@ag2357 only for documentation purposes, I swear! This is a judgement free zone, right?! :flushed:

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Congratulations that is one awesome accomplishment :sunglasses:

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Congratulations that’s awesome! I don’t know a lot of people who have successfully bred tri colors!! Super cool stuff!!!

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Be prepared for lots of babies, my female just laid her 7th clutch, once every 40 days or so. Whether I introduce the male or not. They just won’t stop.

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Also, eggs show little to no veining when candled at first, they take a couple weeks to show up. Look infertile to begin with. 90 days to hatch at 78.

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Maybe that is why they are such a short lived species? Rapid reproduction probably takes a toll. Or maybe they are designed for it through evolution because they are short lived.

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Perhaps, I don’t know why we aren’t knee deep in the little guys.

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sorry uploaded the wrong pic, saw the orange and white, thought it was the pair.

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@som16724 Thanks for the info! I have a second female, but I might hold off introducing the male to her until I’m confident I can find homes for the babies. Also going to be looking at some selective breeding to increase the white, red, or black in future breedings.

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They’re only short lived because people feed them rodents, I’m afraid.

Has it been documented that they live longer in the wild on a amphibian diet? Just curious.

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There’s a MPR podcast episode with Dr. Zac Loughman about snake digestion in which he mentions tricolors and other related species. The whole podcast is full of really valuable information and I’d encourage everyone to give it a listen. If I recall correctly there hasn’t been a study specifically on tricolors in the wild, just anecdotal evidence that they’ve had longer lived animals in captivity on non-rodent diets.

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Here’s the podcast in question, tricolors are mentioned around the 44 minute mark.
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